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Chrissie

Sketch Video: Drawing The Hulk!

As videos like this are quite popular, I’ve been toying with doing some recently. So I uploaded this one a while ago, but I was/am dissatisfied with the picture quality—I’m currently stuck with a camera that fares very badly over USB 2.0 in terms of quality & compression. (I do have access to a couple of nice cinema cameras, but honestly, for videos like this it’s better to keep it simple.)

Finally I decided to unleash it anyway… meanwhile, I shall be looking into a better video/camera solution.

Obviously, drawing the Hulk was an easy/lazy topic for me… the Hulk is my default go-to (and Herb Trimpe’s version the Gold Standard). This isn’t necessarily the best version I ever did. But it’s okay. For future vids, I’d like your suggestions, please. Suggest anything! If it isn’t ridiculous or impractical, I might give it a go.

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Neal Adams

Really, really sad to hear about the passing of Neal Adams. I think most of us can agree that he’s a highly significant figure in comics history.

I thought Neal was sure to be around for another 10-15 years, and producing decent art more or less till the day he died. The latter is virtually true—he was working on commissions as recently as ten days ago—but sadly, he had been fighting the effects of a sepsis infection for the past 11 months. That’s a tough battle at any age.

His later work is probably the stuff that will come to mind for some folks, and that’s… well, a small part of the story!! Neal’s art, for the past 30-35 years, has been generally solid and consistent, sometimes quite beautiful, if seldom a match for his peak stuff from the late ’60s through mid-’70s. But, it might be his increasingly eccentric writing that’s gained the most attention in recent years.

Batman: Odyssey, from 2010-11, which ran for 13 issues over two mini-series, had a lot of people scratching their heads. The distinctive and occasionally stunning visuals were a given, but Neal’s writing—barely flirting with conventional structure or internal logic—made the series something of a cult item. His writing only got weirder and more esoteric later on!

Batman Odyssey 7

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2022 Viewing (Q1)

OK, so it’s 2022’s first-quarter viewings… Q4 of 2021 can be viewed here.

Have Gun Will Travel seasons 5-6 (DVD)
The Rifleman season 1 (DVD)
Batman and Robin 1949 serial (DVD)
Atom Man vs Superman 1950 serial (DVD)
Radar Men from the Moon 1952 serial (DVD)

A bit low on completed season viewings, but a very fond farewell to Have Gun Will Travel—things won’t seem the same without Paladin on the screen several times a week. On the other hand, Chuck Connors as Lucas McCain in Rifleman is a great stand-in… currently two-thirds through season 2, whilst also working through the spin-off series starring the excellent Michael Ansara, as Marshal Sam Buckhart—Law of the Plainsman. (You can view both series in their entirety on YouTube, if you’re so inclined.)

Chuck Connors & Johnny Crawford - Rifleman
Chuck Connors with co-star Johnny Crawford—publicity still for THE RIFLEMAN (1958).

And movies! We’ve watched some movies.

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Ray Harryhausen

As mentioned here, finally the post about Ray Harryhausen—not before time, as his work loomed large in my childhood!

(I’m assuming everyone knows who Ray is, and what stop-motion animation is…)

Stop-motion is, of course, long since deprecated, especially since the wonders of CGI took over everything and made the world of cinema so much more entertaining and lovely. Maybe I’m being a little facetious. Maybe I just prefer the human touch and don’t feel shiny perfection is the be-all and end-all of everything. How old-fashioned!!

Ray, like everyone else who saw it as a kid, became absolutely obsessed with the original King Kong (1933) when he got to see it during its original run. The ground-breaking visuals in Kong (especially the stop-motion work) inspired Ray to pursue the field himself. Unlike everyone else, he actually got to meet FX pioneer Willis O’Brien, who became his mentor.

Kong was my absolute fave as a little kid (still is, really). Well, how could you not love this fella?

King Kong

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2021 Viewing (Q4)

Finally—2021’s fourth-quarter viewings… Q3 can be viewed here.

Alfred Hitchcock Presents season 7 (DVD)
Wanted Dead Or Alive season 3 (DVD)
Have Gun Will Travel season 4 (DVD)
Star Trek: The Original Series season 3 (Blu-ray)
Naked City season 2 (DVD)
The Phil Silvers Show season 3 (DVD)
Flash Gordon’s Trip to Mars 1938 serial (DVD)
Flash Gordon Conquers the Universe 1940 serial (DVD)
King of the Rocket Men 1949 serial (DVD)
Batman 1943 serial (DVD)
Superman 1948 serial (DVD)
Hancock/Hancock’s Half Hour various of the surviving episodes (DVD)

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Amphius Man

Who?! Why, this guy:

Amphy 2021

He’s the first ‘proper’ character I ever created, I believe, back in 1981. For his origin and some very old artwork (haven’t you all wanted to see how dreadful my art was as a kid/youth?!), read on…

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Back Again

Yep, another little hiatus, but honestly I doubt I went a single day without thinking about what to blog next. I did want to commit to keeping this fairly ongoing again. And I will. But those of you who are regular readers, I hope, will feed me a little with feedback so I don’t feel excessively lonely here!

And, yes, some stuff has happened since October 27th. For one thing, Tikki had a trip up North to meet a Westie pal named Marco…

Tikki Marco Oct 21
Tikki & Marco in Lincoln, October 28th 2021

For another, it was my COUGHrd birthday on Oct 30.

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Laurel & Hardy: The Definitive Restorations 3

Continuing commentary on the Blu-ray set of Laurel & Hardy: The Definitive Restorations , following up on postings here and here.

Since the last post, I’ve viewed the shorts Hog Wild (1930), Come Clean and One Good Turn (both 1931), and the feature Sons of the Desert (1933). All have superb commentary tracks by Randy Skretvedt—whose L&H book is absolutely definitive (to overuse the word!). I bought the first edition paperback in early 1988, and this copy is still with me—and in surprisingly good shape! The newest edition is more of the same, only much more, but it’s an indispensible tome whatever edition you own. (I own both. I wouldn’t part with that first edition.)

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